The 10 Best Careers — By Starting Salary, Best Benefits, Job Satisfaction & More

Whether you’re a soon-to-be college grad or a seasoned veteran, knowing the “bests” and the “worsts” of the career world will give you a leg up in deciding where to start out, where to stay or where to move on to.

10 Best Starting Salaries

  1. Software design & development $53,729
  2. Consulting $49,781
  3. Design/construction engineering $47,058
  4. Financial/treasury analysis $45,596
  5. Accounting (private) $44,564
  6. Accounting (public) $41,039
  7. Registered nurse $38,775
  8. Sales $37,130
  9. Management trainee $35,811
  10. Teaching $29,733

10 Best Companies to Work For

(Based on employees’ responses to the “Great Place to Work Trust Index,” a proprietary employee survey developed by the Great Place to Work Institute.)

  1. Wegmans Food Markets
  2. W. L. Gore
  3. Republic Bancorp
  4. Genentech
  5. Xilinx
  6. J. M. Smucker
  7. S. C. Johnson & Son
  8. Griffin Hospital
  9. Alston & Bird
  10. Vision Service Place

10 Most Satisfying Jobs

(Based 35 percent on potential for job growth, 35 percent on salary growth potential, 20 percent on how many in the field hold a college degree, and 10 percent on freedom to be innovative and creative.)

  1. Personal finance adviser
  2. Medical scientist
  3. Computer software engineer
  4. Chiropractor
  5. Environmental engineer
  6. Biochemist and biophysicist
  7. Sales manager
  8. Epidemiologist
  9. Computer system analyst
  10. Athlete

10 Fastest Growing Fields

(These will add the largest percentage of positions through 2012.)

  1. Network systems & communications analysts 57.0%
  2. Physician assistants 48.9%
  3. Software engineers 45.5%
  4. Physical therapist assistants 44.6%
  5. Fitness trainers 44.5%
  6. Database administrators 44.2%
  7. Dental hygienists 43.1%
  8. Hazardous material removal workers 43.1%
  9. Computer systems analysts 39.4%
  10. Environmental engineers 38.2%

10 Hottest Jobs

(These will have the most net gains through 2012 (in thousands)).

  1. Teachers (K-12) 724,000
  2. Registered nurses 623,000
  3. Post-secondary teachers 603,000
  4. Customer service reps 458,000
  5. Computer support 420,000
  6. General operations managers 376,000
  7. Sales representatives 356,000
  8. Truck drivers 337,000
  9. Software engineers 307,000
  10. Accountants and auditors 205,000

10 Companies With the Best Benefits

(Based on retirement plans, strong medical coverage, premium subsidies by employers, disability options, group life insurance, accidental death and dismemberment coverage, medical and retirement packages for part-time employees, and effective communication methods to enable workers to capitalize on those benefits.)

  1. Flexible Steel Lacing Company, Downers Grove, IL
  2. American Council of Life Insurers, Washington, D.C.
  3. American Lung Association, New York, NY
  4. GuideOne Insurance, West Des Moines, LA
  5. Campus USA Credit Union, Gainesville, FL
  6. The Washington Trust Company, Westerly, RI
  7. Southwest Power Pool, Inc., Little Rock, AR
  8. Glatfelter Insurance Group, York, PA
  9. Moran Towing Corporation, New Canaan, CT
  10. Fremont Co-operative Produce Company, Fremont, MI

10 Most Dangerous Jobs

(Based on fatality rate.)

  1. Logging workers
  2. Aircraft pilots
  3. Fishers and fishing workers
  4. Structural iron and steel workers
  5. Refuse and recyclable material collectors
  6. Farmers and ranchers
  7. Roofers
  8. Electrical power line installers/repairers
  9. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers
  10. Taxi drivers and chauffeurs

Get Out of Credit Card Debt – An Easy Way to Get Out of Debt in 2010

According to financial analysts, the year 2010 will reduce the damaging recession effects. How will that happen? When was settlement solutions introduced for the first time to get out of credit card debt. This was in the year 2009 when inflation was in full swing and every thing was becoming more and more expensive. In this situation, credit card usage should be stopped immediately. When there is an economic crisis, you need to hold on to your savings. Using plastic money will not play any role in saving money. You need to reduce the usage of plastic money to get out of credit card debt.

Reasons for the increase of unsecured liabilities

The excess of anything is bad. Before you are applying for a credit card, you need to ask yourself the following questions.

1. Do you need a card?

2. Can you afford it with your monthly salary package?

3. Can you pay the interest cost?

4. What purposes do you need it for?

Credit card has become a necessity so everyone needs. Even college going students have cards with smaller limits to buy books, gadgets and food. Carrying cash is not feasible in every case. For instance, if you lose a hundred dollar bill, will you ever get is back again. There are very rare chances that someone would find it and not keep it. If you lose your credit card, you don’t lose anything if you file a complaint in a timely manner. If your card gets lost or stolen, you can get it locked by telling your pin code number. In this case, if someone finds it, he will not be able to use it.

How much are you drawing every month/ if you are drawing a sum of three thousand dollars, why do you need to take the headache of a credit card. Believe me! It turns out to be a pain in the neck. Hence if you can cover everything with cash, there is no need to applying for a card. It will be much easier to get out of debt if you have limited expenses.

Open you eyes and stop trusting your bank in a blind manner. To get out of card debt, you need to realize a lot of things. Banks can increase their interest rate without even consulting their customers. Bank policies change without proper notifications as well. If you don’t have a dire need to a credit card, it is better not to keep it. The best way to get out of credit card debt is to analyze your costs and prevent spending money on extravagant things.

High Pay Still Found in Finance

Though the stock market remains wildly prone to fluctuations and the United States barely saved itself from veering off a fiscal cliff at the new year, the high pay of finance jobs has remained a steadfast thing. And the number of people seeking such jobs has, if anything, been on the rise-even as the amount of spots available moves the other direction on the number line.

“I’m looking to go into finance” is a common phrase among soon-to-graduate and recently graduated college students. But what exactly does “going into finance” look like? Finance is an industry, and the term blankets a lot of different positions. Finance jobs include everything from being an analyst to being a trader, from being a researcher to being a consultant. When most people think “finance,” investment banking, also called iBanking, is what first comes to mind. Specifically, bulge bracket banks like Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan Chase, and Morgan Stanley come to mind. But these firms only comprise a small (if highly profitable and reputable) piece of the finance pie. Job-seekers can also break into the finance career bubble through sales and trading divisions, corporate finance, hedge funds (a harder point of entry for fresh BAs), consulting firms, (McKinsey & Co., Boston Consulting Group’s HOLT associates division), private wealth (Charles Schwab, PNC Wealth Management) management firms, and even ratings agencies (Moody’s, Standard & Poor’s). And within iBanking alone, there is further job breakdown into three types of groups: capital market, product, and industry groups. Basically, “finance” is deceptively simple-there are dozens of ways to wriggle into the finance sector.

The pay, of course, differs from position to position and from company to company. At a big investment bank, first-year analysts will typically make around $70k base salary plus a $10k signing bonus and $50k to $60k year-end bonus. At a hedge fund, the hiring salary can go up to $90-$100k base plus an even more significant year-end bonus-but generally only analysts with an MBA or prior iBanking experience will make this kind of money right off the bat.Entry-level private wealth management salaries can also be over $80,000. First-year traders bring in similar base salaries to analysts but usually expect less of a bonus-around $20K to $30K. Ratings or credit analysts tend to make slightly less than these other positions, around $55K base salary, but compared to the larger scope of American and international pay grades, that is still a more-than-respectable entry-level salary. And once someone is inside the finance worlds, his/her chances for mobility into different sectors and positions greatly increase.

Of course, no money comes free, and no one getting into the finance world can expect to get his/her salary without doing a lot of work-sometimes 100 hours a week of it. Analysts joke that analysts don’t have a life, and at times that joke rings all too true. But the applications for finance jobs keep coming and will keep coming. The bonuses may not be as extravagant as they once were, nor is the path to rise through the ranks of a firm as smooth and certain. Yet no other industry can promise pretty much across the board $50k plus entry-level salaries, especially after the recession. High pay has remained a stable fact for those who can say they are “in finance,” and in unstable times, that kind of stability is something for which many are willing to fight.